These Countries Are Considered To Be The Wealthiest In The World

Published on 12/27/2020
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Wealth is measured in many ways. Many see it exclusively as the assets you have, whilst others take a gander at the standard of your life or personal resources. The same goes for evaluating the prosperity of nations. A few other countries, such as Indonesia and China, may dominate the world in the gross domestic product, but they have low incomes and severe poverty more often than not. We merged three wealth indicators to see whether the nations with the highest accurate gross domestic product (GDP) value, average wage, medical Development Index help us search through several numbers to uncover the world’s wealthiest economies.

These Countries Are Considered To Be The Wealthiest In The World

These Countries Are Considered To Be The Wealthiest In The World

Costa Rica

The small Central American nation of Costa Rica is the beginning of our list of the 50 richest nations. A high list of water and sanitation scores, access to nutrition, essential healthcare, and human freedoms boosts the Costa Rican SPI. In the SPI, certain imperfections take it down to No. 33, including a score of 36.36 for access to high-quality education, 65.66 for personal protection, and 65.89 for inclusiveness.

Costa Rica

Costa Rica

Croatia

Croatia is not exactly a nation in the world that anyone would look at while contemplating prosperity, and we can’t really blame them for its $60.8 billion worldwide GDP rating and its $10,314 average income ranking No. 94. Its No. 37 SPI standing is just where Croatia tends to make up a lot of ground, which helped it reach our No. 49 ranking of richest nations. This SPI ranking is enhanced by high safe water and sanitation ratings, basic healthcare access, and decent knowledge access.

Croatia

Croatia

Latvia

This European nation’s $34.8 billion GDP is mediocre. Nevertheless, it’s No. 39 rankings in the SPI seeks to bring it back into balance. High scores for access to nutrition and adequate healthcare, clean water, and sanitation, as well as individual rights, boost the SPI ratings. But this was weighed down by a score of 44.34 in terms of access to the best education and 51.14 in terms of inclusiveness.

Latvia

Latvia

Algeria

Algeria, classified No. 47, is the only African country in our classification. Algeria has no extraordinary numbers, but its 56th position was 180.7 billion GDP. Its 58th place was rated as an average of $22,064, stability, which puts it at the bottom of our list of the top 50 richest countries. Algeria is failing to sustain its SPI at No. 75. While its 20.24 results and 42.58 included scores in access to the best education drop it down. Simultaneously, it does earn OK ratings for the inaccessibility to food and medical treatment and the provision of fundamental information.

Algeria

Algeria

Turkey

Turkey has a unique GDP of 766.5 billion dollars, rendering it the 19th biggest nation globally. Concerning wealth, this form may make it much higher, but it still has extreme disadvantages in the overall revenue and the SPI classification. Turkey is actually No. 93 in annual wages at about $10,380 for Turkish laborers.

Turkey

Turkey

Slovakia

In the light of the low GDP and median wages, the heavily forested Central Europe country of Slovakia has tested our rating at No 45. SPI’s No. 35 rating offers Slovakia broad access to safe water, hygiene, food and health care, and accommodation. In terms of admission to university education, SPI has 39.97 marks, but this is a common norm in Europe. Slovakia has slid; its GDP No. 63 was $106.5 billion, while the average income of No. 90 was just $10,653.

Slovakia

Slovakia

Romania

Romania may not have been new on people’s minds as we ponder the most affluent countries globally, but it has been ranked No. 49 by Kudos and has a $239.6 billion in GDP and no. 44 by SPI. The latter statistic is primarily attributed to the county’s excellent access to food and healthcare. Romanian SPI appears to have links to the top 38.75 status and an integration rate of 45.31. Romania’s annual income of $11,290,0 rated no. 89 is deep down in the size of the wealthiest nations.

Romania

Romania

Malaysia

Southeast Asia is substantially underrepresented in that classification, but Malaysia continues to fall only below… No. 43’s cut with a reasonably strong $354,3 billion in GDP, which sets No. 38 in the world. If it is listed, the average income is what much of the country concerns about. Jobs pay just $10,460 annually, bringing the nation to No. 92 globally even collapses a tad in SPI at No. 50. The Malaysian SPI classification has pumped up strong scores for obtaining water and sanitation, accommodation, nutrition, and access to medical care. Malaysia fights for inclusiveness, advanced education availability, and personal freedom with a combined ranking of40.98, 45.4, and 58.9.

Malaysia

Malaysia

Estonia

With a GDP of $30.2 billion that currently places No. 104 globally, Estonia is well above what others can consider being one of several wealthiest nations. Its annual income of $26,898, rated No. 47, doesn’t benefit much either. Its SPI No. 27 ratings effectively places this European country at No. 42 in our ranking. Estonia smashes the SPI with top scores in access to safe water and access to education and adequate health services and random. Like several other European nations, it could benefit from the change in its 52.81 access points to academic education, and so could its 55.07 inclusiveness points.

Estonia

Estonia

China

China is yet another one-hit-wonder in our rating, just like it strangles everyone but the US with its No. 2 rated 13.6 trillion GDP but fallen dramatically in earnings as well as SPI. The other circles in our No. 66 lists, and it is obvious to see where it goes for all of the media China gets: a personal freedom score of 27.04, inclusiveness score of 31.02, and access to the best schooling score of 39.45. China sets the pace of access to medical treatment. China’s most enormous flaw is its annual revenue, actually ranked 102nd in the nation, with only $9,470 a year.

China

China

Russia

Russia happens to have a whopping $1.7 trillion GDP, making it No. 11 in the nation, but it fell dramatically to No. 40 on our ranking because of its $10,230 annual income, ranking No. 95. At No. 66, SPI is not doing any favors at all. Good ratings on access to medical services, access to basic knowledge, and water and sanitation improve Russian SPI figures. However, the findings of 33.69, 45.74, and 52.87 are dragging in the opposite direction in terms of inclusiveness, personal protection, and human freedom.

Russia

Russia

Lithuania

This European nation’s GDP of $53.3 billion is actually rated just No. 86 globally, and its total income of $26,429 is less than No. 50 in the world. Nevertheless, its No. 31 rating in SPI gives it a lift. In the SPI, Lithuania is strongly rated for accessibility to appropriate medical services, water and sanitation access, and human rights. Access to academic education is poor at 49.79 points, as so many euro countries, but wellbeing and well-being, as well as inclusiveness, are both low at 67.84 and 63.54 points.

Lithuania

Lithuania

Saudi Arabia

No compilation of the wealthiest nations would have been exhaustive without Saudi Arabia as the world’s largest crude source. As per OPEC, almost half of Saudi Arabia’s $782.4 billion GDP, ranked No. 18, appears to be crude. Saudi Arabia, with such a strong GDP rating, should be better than No. 38. However, the average salary of the No. 61 was $21,540, and the No. 86 SPI rating almost took it off the ranking entirely. Saudi Arabia’s SPI enjoys rewards from easy access to drinking, hygiene, and sufficient healthcare. However, it suffers enormous hits with three terrible outcomes: 13.87 inclusiveness points, 17.26 personal rights points, and 36.82 access points to academic education.

Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia

Brazil

As the globe’s annual salary of $9,140 rates No. 103, Brazil demonstrates how a country can solve one enormous weakness with a major ranking in any other bracket. However, it brings it back into our ranking with its No. 9-ranked 1.9 trillion GDP. It is its rating of No. 49 in the SPI that balances everything out. These places in the SPI owe a great deal to the country’s strong marks regarding access to medical services and water and sanitation. However, tremendous hits are required to access highly developed schooling and personal protection, which received ratings of 36.80 and 47.26, respectively.

Brazil

Brazil

Cyprus

Cyprus, an island country across the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, was on our list at No. 36, but definitely not thanks to its own $24.5 billion GDP, ranked No. 112 worldwide. Cyprus performs admirably. The SPI’s average income of $45,705 ranks No. 20 and No. 28. This is largely attributable to the country’s clean water and sanitation, access to proper medical care, and personal rights (although it has struggled with water shortages in the old days). If it weren’t the best education for its 53.27 points, this score would have been better.

Cyprus

Cyprus

Chile

In our list of wealthiest nations, this other country in South America, Chile, is now on No. 35. I looked at its huge coastline, but not really at its average earnings of $14,670.0 at No. 78. At No 43, its $298.2-billion GDP is indeed significantly lower. However, its No. 34 SPI ranking gives it a shot needed to reach the bottom half of our list. Chile’s SPI is boosted by a high water and sanitation rating, access to medical care, and individual rights, but brought down by its 43.69 access to the best education.

Chile

Chile

Argentina

Argentina’s South America’s major country, is No. 34 on the world’s wealthiest chart. With all its $12,370 annual wage ringing in at the globe’s No. 84, it’s not pleasant. Though, its $518.5 billion GDP is actually ranked No. 24 and tends to bump it up. Its SPI No. 42 ratings is leveling out. Access to water and sanitation in Argentina and decent healthcare offer a significant boost to its SPI ranking. However, its 40,82 points for access to the best school and 58,37 points for personal protection downgrade its overall ranking.

Argentina

Argentina

Qatar

Like the UAE, Qatar is a nation abundant in crude, one of the world’s highest annual incomes. Unfortunately, as per The Economist, its income disparity surpasses that of the UAE, with top earners making 13 times the poorest, pushing its average income to $36,958, currently ranked No 36. Pulling Qatar down to No. 33 is its GDP and SPI ratings on our richest list of nations. These key categories rank No. 55 and No. 58, respectively, with a GDP of just $192 billion and SPI suffering from extreme hardships with inclusiveness, individual rights, and access to advanced education.

Qatar

Qatar

Mexico

Mexico claims to have an enormous $1.2 trillion in GDP, placing it number 15 globally. It appears to come into our ranking of richest countries only at No. 32, even after this significant number. Mexico’s largest fall stems from its No. 73 ranked average wages of just $16,298. Its SPI rating No. 59, however, also does not promote it. The SPI rating reflects average water and sanitation scores and basic healthcare scores. Still, it falls well short of 45.80 in access to the best education, 48.27 in personal safety, and 62.06 in personal choice and freedom in major aspects.

Mexico

Mexico

Hungary

Hungary, which has an SPI ranked No. 36 due to its high water supply and sanitation ratings, access to medical care, and access to basic knowledge, was the richest country in our ranking. However, the SPI figures were not all excellent as it continues to struggle with access to the best education with such a 50.29 score and inclusiveness with a 58.56 score. The $155.7 billion GDP No. 58 and No. 53 ranked average salary of just $24,455 is just where Hungary lacks points.

Hungary

Hungary

Slovenia

Slovenia is ranked number 30. However, its $54.2 billion GDP number 85 could well give rise to many, leaving it off any list of richest nations. Its No. 35 ranked $37,322 average wage, and the SPI’s No. 22 standings help drag it back into action. Thanks to its clean water, basic knowledge, and personal rights, the latter is the rating. It sounds low with 52.58 access to the best education, but comparable to its European neighbors.

Slovenia

Slovenia

Greece

Like Portugal, with its $218 billion GDP or $26,671 annual wage, ranked No. 53 and No. 48 respectively, our No. 29 wealthiest nations, Greece, will not blast away any and everybody. And for SPI No. 29, Greece is back with clean water, adequate healthcare, and basic knowledge. Like many Euro countries, with a rating of 55,79, Greece struggles to access advanced education, negatively affecting its overall score a tad.

Greece

Greece

Portugal

Portugal’s No. 50 ranked $238 billion in GDP, as well as No. 52, ranked $25,487. Average sales won’t win any accolades, but still enough to place it No. 28 in total, taken along with its No. 24 rankings in SPI. Thanks to its safe water and sanitation, this high ranking results from basic healthcare access and individual rights. Portugal is short on access to the best education, with such a rating of 46.78, but all other assessments are 72.89 or higher.

Portugal

Portugal

Iceland

In our list of the richest countries, Iceland is #27. However, ranked 110th, its $25.9 billion GDP is not really a perfect measure of its income. With near-perfect scores in water supply and sanitation, and critical health care, the No. 2 ranked SPI is where Iceland plays best. It is also a world pioneer in delivering fundamental information and personal freedom, although it comes far short with a ranking of 61.91 for access to the best education. Iceland is also a pioneer in average sales, with its $66,504 annual earnings ranking No. 6 worldwide.

Iceland

Iceland

Czech Republic

The Czech Republic was famed for ramping out hockey stars and not so much for its finished goods, culminating in a $244.1 billion GDP in the No. 48 lists. It is not doing any better with its No. 34-ranked monthly pay of $26,962. The Czech Republic still ranks No. 26 on our ranking, considering its decreased GDP and wage rate, thanks to its No. 26 SPI. The Czech Republic’s SPI is receiving a boost thanks to high water and sanitation scores, basic medical services, and personal privileges. Like several other euro nations, the Czech Republic is failing with just 56.14 out of 100 points regarding access to the best school.

Czech Republic

Czech Republic

United Arab Emirates

With $414.2 billion in GDP rated No. 30, as well as $41,010.0 in average earnings, reported No. 26, the UAE checks in at No. 25 in our rating. Besides restricted outstanding education contributes to access to the advanced education of 39.39, the tight UAE policies carry an individual rights score of 54.72, pressing it to No. 45 in the SPI list. Great scores for water supply and sanitation, proximity to accommodation, and essential healthcare have been obtained by the UAE, but these poor assessments will not be resolved.

United Arab Emirates

United Arab Emirates

Israel

Israel is actually rated in the ’30s in all three of our main metrics, seeking to make it even taking it absolutely around the board and accruing it to the No. 24 overall positions on the ranking. Its GDP and average wage numbered No. 34 globally at $369.4 billion and $37,655, respectively. Its position on the Social Change Index keeps moving it up marginally. The perfect water source and sanitation score of 100 and top scores in basic healthcare and basic skills are also included in fields where Israel shines in the SPI. At 43.11 for inclusiveness and 59.46 points for admission to advanced schooling, it falls just short.

Israel

Israel

Poland

Poland is close to the halfway point in the list of our wealthiest countries at No. 23. There were no actual glaring positive or poor statistics for Poland, as it is average in most areas. Its GDP of $585.8 billion was recently ranked No. 21 in the nation and No. 32 in its SPI checks. Poland’s SPI is thriving with strong outcomes in water supply and hygiene, nutrition, and access to essential information. However, its 48,74 ratings are reasonably low in terms of access to the best education. Income ranks No. 43 at $29,109 annually.

Poland

Poland

New Zealand

While not as significant as Luxembourg, New Zealand has also achieved a slight GDP to report our rating at No. 22. With such a $205 billion GDP, this island nation is No. 53 in the world, but it is dragged up by its No. 10 ratings in the SPI, which owes it a complete 100 score in water supply and sanitation, as well as a better ranking in essential healthcare and individual rights. Balancing all this out is its No. 25-ranked annual income of $ 42,325.

New Zealand

New Zealand

Luxembourg

A comparatively small European republic, Luxembourg checks in at No. 21 and shows how well a nation with a few top marks can transcend a single poor ranking. With a tiny population just south of 600,000, this nation’s $69.5 billion GDP is not a drop in the foreign bucket. Its fairly high annual income of $65,449, which places No. 7 in the country, pulls it out of the closet in terms of total wealth. It is No. 8 ranking in SPI, which also owes its position near the center of the spectrum to a sky-high rating in water supply and sanitation, decent health treatment, and individual rights, improves its position.

Luxembourg Kirchberg At Sunset

Luxembourg

Finland

As per the Global Happiness Survey, Finland is also the happiest nation globally, and it is thus upsetting to see that it is not substantially larger than No. 20. As its WHR rankings would say, due to its near-perfect water supply measurements and hygiene, and sufficient healthcare, Finland has recently rated No. 5 in the SPI. It is poor in advanced education at only 55.14, but no tests slipped below 82.28 out of 100 points. Its annual sales of No. 43-ranked $275.7 billion in GDP and No. 20-ranked $44,111 is where Finland falters. Maybe wealth doesn’t contribute to satisfaction.

Finland

Finland

Singapore

Singapore’s small country is indeed an unexpected addition to our No. 19 list of 50 wealthiest nations. Just what helps push it so high on our ranking is the $58,770 average income of the country, which is again No. 10 in the world. Singapore was ranked No. 23 in SPI, two places just above the U.S., because of its full 100 scores in water supply and sanitation as well as 98.25 in access to basic knowledge. On the contrary, Singapore ranks low in personal rights at 70.88 points out of 100.

Singapore

Singapore

Spain

Spain is ranked No. 18 in the top 50 wealthiest nations, and owing everything of its $1.4 trillion GDP, which is actually ranked No. 14 in the world. It does not hurt, though, that its strong rankings in water and sanitation, medical treatment, and environmental sustainability drive its SPI to No. 19 globally. Spain’s first and only downside is its gross annual salary of $38,761, which is No. 31 in the country. Even Spain is one of Europe’s least costly countries, and maybe you’ll find more than acceptable average pay.

Spain

Spain

Ireland

Ireland lands at No. 17 out of the 50 wealthiest countries, far better than the Irish’s good fortune. It is also Ireland’s 12th SPI rating, which can then be linked to strong scores of access to proper medical services, water and sanitation, and human rights. Relative to the rest of the world, compared to other European countries, its 69.43 points of access to the best schooling is poor yet strong. GDP seems to be the only sore point for Ireland, as its $375.9 billion GDP is #32 in the world.

Ireland

Ireland

Austria

Austria ranks among the 50 richest countries at No. 16. This land-locked European nation stops just short, with its $455.7 billion GDP checking in at No. 27, as well as SPI ringing in at No. 20 only. Austria is competitive in both safe water and sanitation and its essential healthcare at SPI. Still, its contribution to specialized schooling is poor at 46.27, just like its European neighbors failing in this field.

Vienna Aerial Hofburg Heldenplatz Austrian National Library

Austria

Italy

Italy is good at No. 15 in our wealthiest countries list, with a decent GDP of 2,1 trillion dollars, actually No. 8 in the globe. The typical Italian worker’s salary, which corresponds to about $37,752, and its ranking number 21 in the SPI, keep it back. The boot-shaped nation’s SPI ranking is backed by its strong scores in water and sanitation, decent healthcare, and individual rights, but its 66.7 point access to best schooling and 74.41 points in personal preference and independence are weighted down.

Italy

Italy

South Korea

South Korea, not to be confused by all its extroverted and marginalized Northern rivals, is now on our chart at No. 14. Its average revenue of $39,472 is down. The world’s $1.6 trillion GDP, however, is No. 12. No. 18 South Korea’s SPI received a big boost from the country’s safe water and sanitation, adequate healthcare, and access to information and communication. However, it is 78.94 out of 100 points on the low end of personal freedom and choice. That’s much better than 3,62 of North Korea’s 100 points in the same section.

South Korea

South Korea

Sweden

Sweden’s GDP of $551 billion and the globe’s average annual income of $44,196 are No. 22 and No. 23, respectively. But the nation’s No. 11 ratings in the SPI give it a great result in our final standings. Sweden’s SPI standings are dominated by clean water, proper health care, and environmental quality. Like its European neighbors, access to advanced education has been low at 58.99 out of 100 points.

Sweden

Sweden

Belgium

Belgium has crossed a thin line in both ranks, winning out at No. 14 with an annual income of $52,080 and No. 17 in the SPI, culminating in a No. 12 ranks in our list. In water supplies and hygiene, basic welfare and medical services, and provision to housing in the SPI, Belgium succeeds. However, its access to specialized education ranking of 59.78 represents and adversely influences various other European countries. Belgium’s $531.7 billion GDP is somewhere over the halfway point on the top 50 charts.

Belgium

Belgium

Denmark

Similar to Norway, Denmark still enjoys top marks around the world for its social consciousness. On the road to a No. 4 rankings in the SPI, water, hygiene, access to shelter, and medical services are among the greatest accomplishments. Still, it tends to fail to deliver advanced education because of its 56.82 out of 100 scores. Indeed, average sales are high at $55,253, making it No. 11 in the nation, but its GDP of $351.2 billion at No. 38 is in the lower third of our top 50.

Denmark

Denmark

Norway

Norway also sees itself as one of the most socially-conscious countries worldwide with minimal emissions, excellent hospitals, and fantastic assistance. All this with the SPI No. 1 rating is illustrated. It rises to the surface with 53.31 with a total of 100 points of entry to the best education but is not enough to carry it down. No. 29 GDP and 50,966 No. 15, the annual salary of Norway’s $ 434 billion, pulled the overall ranks to number ten on our list of the world’s wealthiest nations. Yet, it’s always powerful regardless of these weaknesses.

Norway

Norway

France

France is number 6 in the world at $ 2.8 trillion in GDP and is set to rank higher. Its average revenues of $44,510 are now only #22 worldwide, taking its full riches to #9. Ability to sanitation and sanitary standards, essential healthcare, and access to accommodation in France are noted in the SPI rating at 16. However, there are also prospects for improvement at the exposure to professional learning and inclusiveness, which also gather 64,28 out of 100 or 67,48 in 100, respectively.

France

France

Canada

Canada is the eighth wealthiest country globally, with a GDP rating of No. 10 and SPI No. 14 for having $1.7 trillion income. The second is attributed to 98,44 of 100 bad healthcare items and a ranking of 95,74 for human freedom. The lowest region in Canada seems to be 69.43 points in terms of access to advanced schooling, which may be specifically associated with Canada’s large rural regions.

Canada

Canada

Australia

Australia has very consistent aggregate evaluations, with GDP No 13 and an average $1.4 trillion in turnout, respectively, and $53,349 in turnover. It appears to be a little poor at No. 15 of SPI but still scores strongly in food and basic wellbeing, water and hygiene, personal rights, and access to knowledge and communications. In reality, it does, even so, just 69.31 points out of 100 in access to the best schooling. All this is the same as No. 7 on our ranking of the richest nations.

Australia

Australia

United Kingdom

The United Kingdom, the world’s six richest nations, has a cumulative position from the Netherlands. The average income is nine points below the Netherlands level, and GDP is only $44,770 a year, whereas the $2,8 billion is 12 points higher than the Netherlands. It was even smaller in six locations in SPI, with participation and connection to advanced education proving to be painful spots.

United Kingdom

United Kingdom

Netherlands

The Netherlands is closely related to Japan with only a 12-ranked average, but it ends up jumping all the way to number 5 in our ranking. Dutch GDP of 912.8 billion dollars is reported only at No 17 in 2018. The annual salary of 54,262 dollars, however, gradually improved. In SPI, Japan was preceded by the Netherlands by a certain venue. The Netherlands achieved in the same ways as Japan in SPI except for a slightly higher right ranking.

Netherlands

Netherlands

Japan

Japan’s GDP is $4.9 billion worldwide in 2018, which made them No. 3 on the list. Its annual salary of 40,753 dollars decreases to No.4 in our wealthiest nation list, however. It has the No. 6 rankings in SPI, owing to its high quality in water supply and sanitation, essential information distribution, nutrition, and basic healthcare and accommodation. The SPI region has become the only position of sore inclusivity and admission to advanced training, which may be confusing if the country’s emphasis is on creativity.

Japan

Japan

United States

The US’s GDP is only at the top of the world at $20.5 trillion in 2018, and there is much further on our list than that. No. 3. Indeed, the total salary is 63,093 dollars higher, with world number 9. These two high levels allow it to balance the minimal rating of the SPI No. 25. The US ranks among many of the SPI’s strongest in accommodation, water and hygiene, medical and personal health services, but it is far short of inclusiveness, health, and well-being.

United States

United States

Switzerland

Switzerland has some of the world’s highest pay rate, with an average mean of $64.109, rendering it the second wealthiest country in the world. Besides, it contains a range of the world’s most advanced social markers, such as water supply, food, energy sources, independent news, high school admissions, and greenhouse gas emissions. It is differentiated from Germany by GDP of $705.5 billion, classified as No. 20.

Switzerland

Switzerland

Germany

It is not so difficult to grasp everything on our list as the world’s richest country. Germany has long been at the forefront of GDP and is ranked worldwide in some of the main facets of the GDP: high school enrolment, stable energy, access to clean water and food.

Germany

Germany

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