You Would Never Want To Encounter These Dangerous Snakes In Your Life

Published on 02/20/2020
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Snakes might be legless, clawless, and often toothless, but this has not stopped them from being the most dangerous and spookiest animals on Earth. The most dangerous snakes have bites that can kill a person unbelievably fast. What is it about their venom that makes it such a big threat?

You Would Never Want To Encounter These Dangerous Snakes In Your Life

You Would Never Want To Encounter These Dangerous Snakes In Your Life

You see, snake venom is basically saliva with a number of zootoxins. Some of them can damage the nervous system and cause paralysis. There are others that kill cells, which leads to horrifying gangrene, injuries, and amputation. Aside from these, there are toxins that lead to uncontrollable bleeding and cause blood clots in the body. If that is not enough for you, they are also very painful. These are only a couple of traits possessed by the most dangerous snakes on the planet. Keep reading to find out which one can grow as long as 19 feet or can aim at you from 23 feet away. Mind you, some of these dangerous snakes were even worshipped as gods in some cultures.

Coastal Taipan

There is an old joke going around about how every animal found in Australia wants to kill you. The Common or Coastal Taipan might be one of the reasons for this. It lives in New Guinea and Australia. Its venom comes with neurotoxin so potent that it can kill a victim in only half an hour after the bite. If you ever get bitten by it, we just hope that you will be able to go to the hospital right away.

Coastal Taipan

Coastal Taipan

Philippine Cobra

A lot of people are worried about getting bitten by one of these snakes, but there are some that you should not be anywhere near to at all. The Philippine Cobra has a highly toxic venom that it can spit from up to 3 meters or around 10 feet away. The snake hides in waterways and ponds in fields, farms, and forests in the Philippines.

Philippine Cobra

Philippine Cobra

Black Mamba

The Black Mamba has a rather big subculture popularity because it was made popular by Kill Bill and Kobe Bryant of the NBA. You should know that it is one of the most venomous snakes on the planet. An adult one has enough venom to cause the deaths of 10 people. On top of that, it always bites more than once. This is the reason the victim normally has less than a half-hour to get treated. Black Mambas can be found in the forests of eastern and southern Africa.

Black Mamba

Black Mamba

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake

The Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake is the biggest venomous snake in North America. It can grow as long as 8 feet and boasts of a distinctive black, tan, and grey diamond pattern along the body of this reptile. The good news here is that it is not aggressive and only bites when it is provoked. If you do get bitten, know that it will cause a lot of pain, bleeding, and even death if it is not treated.

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake

Burmese Python

Are you wondering if the snake in the photo is truly eating a crocodile or alligator? If so, you are on the right track. Let us give you a second to take that in. The Burmese python is considered the second biggest snake on the planet in terms of both weight and size. It can reach a length of seven and a half feet up to 19 feet and weigh as much as 400 pounds. They are also nonvenomous constrictors, which means that they can just squeeze a victim to its death.

Burmese Python

Burmese Python

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

For a lot of people, you are not in the American Southwest until you encounter a Western Diamondback Rattlesnake. The snake is more tan and smaller than its eastern counterpart, so it can blend in with the scrub and sand. It has significantly big venom glands and unique fangs that allow it to deliver a huge dose of venom when it bites. It is also not aggressive in general, so you better not provoke it!

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

King Cobra

A lot of venomous snakes are not that big and only rely on venom to stun prey instead of trying to crush the victim underneath its body. Despite this, here is one exception to that rule. The King Cobra can grow up to 13 feet and weigh as much as 30 pounds. The longest one ever documented was 19 feet long. Like the other cobras of Southeast Asia and India, it has a venom deadly enough to cause death in an elephant.

King Cobra

King Cobra

Common Lancehead

The Common Lancehead is also known as Fer-de-lance or Bothrops Atrox. It is an aggressive subspecies of Pit Viper that you will find in the lowlands of northern South America and on some islands in the Caribbean. It can reach up to five feet long and has a grey and brown body. Thanks to its appearance, it can blend in well in the foliage. Its venom is a strong hemotoxin that will cause various neural disorders such as paralysis and memory loss.

Common Lancehead

Common Lancehead

Reticulated Python

This is a photo of a reticulated python all coiled up. It is thought to be the longest snake on the planet! We already checked out anacondas earlier, which is the biggest in terms of both weight and length. Even though the reticulated python is generally less heavy than the anaconda, it does grow even longer. There have reported sightings that these creatures can go up to 33 feet long! As typical of all pythons, it is also a nonvenomous constrictor. There are also cases in which it has killed humans, so beware.

Reticulated Python

Reticulated Python

Eastern Brown Snake

Do you know where you will see the second most venomous snake on the planet? The answer to that is Australia! When you are hiking in the east of Australia, you should watch your step. The snake has a highly neurotoxic venom that can coagulate the blood. The bite will cause renal failure, heart attack, paralysis, and loss of consciousness. The nasty mix of neurotoxins it carries is the reason it accounts for 60% of snakebite deaths in the land down under.

Eastern Brown Snake

Eastern Brown Snake

Anaconda

The anaconda is not venomous, unlike the other entries here. However, that does not make them any less dangerous than the others. Even though it does not normally attack humans, there are cases of anacondas eating people. There are four species of anaconda known, the biggest of which would be the green anaconda. It is even considered the biggest snake known to man! This snake can grow as long as 29 feet and weigh as much as 500 pounds. It does not kill using its venom. No, the anaconda constricts its prey and swallows it whole before digesting it slowly. How fun!

Anaconda

Anaconda

Boomslang

Meet the Boomslang, which is a gorgeous emerald green snake found in sub-Saharan Africa. When it bites, it will open its jaws at nearly 180 degrees and then inject a concentrated venom with the fangs at the back of the jawbone. It is a silent killer, which means that the symptoms will not appear until a few hours after the bite. A lot of victims assume that they are fine and that medical treatment is unnecessary. This is one mistake that could cost you your life. You would not want to make this error.

Boomslang

Boomslang

Indian Cobra

This must be the most famous of all the known cobra species. Mind you, the real version is a lot more deadly than what Disney might have you believe. The Indian cobra can be found all over the Indian subcontinent. It has a venom that can cause paralysis and even a heart attack only 15 minutes after it bites. The deadly snake has a vital part in local legends, myths, and even the Hindu religion. It is a protected species as well.

Indian Cobra

Indian Cobra

African Puff Adder

Fun fact, this snake accounts for the majority of the snakebite fatalities in the African continent. This snake, with its golden and brown body, is even worse than the Black Mamba. It is very aggressive and can blend in well with a dry environment. When prey approaches it, this snake can leverage its body and strike with unbelievable force and speed.

African Puff Adder

African Puff Adder

Monocled Cobra

When you find yourself in swamps or wetlands, you might feel like someone is watching you. It could be the Monocled Cobra if you are in Southeast or South Asia. This is one water-loving cobra that lives in forests, grasslands, and rice paddies. You can distinguish it thanks to the eye-shaped pattern on its hood. It is responsible for many of the snakebite deaths in Thailand since it has a venom that can kill you in only one hour.

Monocled Cobra

Monocled Cobra

Inland Taipan

What is it about the Inland Taipan that makes it the most venomous snake on the planet? This creature is adept at hunting mammals. It has a venom that has evolved to be particularly deadly to warm-blooded species. The bite is a triple threat. Its venom is a cocktail of hemotoxins, myotoxins, and neurotoxins that attack the nervous system, muscular system, and blood all at the same time. There are reports that an adult Inland Taipan carries enough venom to cause death in 100 people.

Inland Taipan

Inland Taipan

Saw-Scaled Viper

In some ways, you can say that the Saw-Scaled Viper is the opposite of the King Cobra. It is a small snake that only grows as long as 3 feet. However, it has a very potent cytotoxic and hemotoxic venom. They can cause debilitating strokes and prolonged bleeding. There are a number of sub-species that can be found in eastern and northern Africa, while others are seen in the wetter parts of the Arabian Peninsula.

Saw-Scaled Viper

Saw-Scaled Viper

Common Krait

There are more deadly snakes in India than you might think. The Common Krait can be found across the subcontinent is also part of the ‘big four’ species that cause most of the snakebite fatalities in the area. The striking animal has black and white ring patterns, which means that it can blend in with the light and shadows on the forest floor. This animal might be non-aggressive, but it waits to deliver the max dose of venom.

Common Krait

Common Krait

Russell’s Viper

City-dwellers across Southeast Asia and India live in fear of this snake. Why is that? Russell’s Viper is a venomous creature that can grow as long as 6 feet. It mostly feeds on rodents. Its hunger for tiny mammals brings it to urban areas. It accounts for a huge percentage of snakebite deaths in the area.

Russell's Viper

Russell’s Viper

Chinese Cobra

A Chinese Cobra on its own is already deadly enough, so can you imagine two snakes together? In 2015, this species made the headlines when a two-headed one was born to a snake breeder based in Yulin, China. In 2009, there were reports of the birth of a two-headed member of the species as well. The highly venomous snake can be found in Taiwan and mainland China.

Chinese Cobra

Chinese Cobra

Sea Snake

What do you get when you give a deadly snake a very toxic venom? The answer is the Sea Snake! It is more toxic than landbound ones and lives in the Indo-Pacific region. It is not aggressive, but it attacks when it gets caught in the fishing nets. The venom can cause paralysis, including respiratory paralysis.

Sea Snake

Sea Snake

Egyptian Cobra

The ancient Egyptians both revered and feared this cobra. It is a prominent figure in their religion and mythology. A gold version of the Egyptian Cobra was also featured on the gold burial mask of King Tutankhamen. Modern Egyptians continue to hold a lot of respect for it. The biggest African cobra species comes with distinctive coloring, huge fangs that it uses to inject a huge dose of venom, and a tear-drop mark close to its eye.

Egyptian Cobra

Egyptian Cobra

Tiger Snake

Tiger Snakes are medium in size, which means that it normally grows to a length of 4 feet. They are common across Tasmania and southern Australia. It got that name come from its distinctive black and gold stripes. This snake has a venom full of myotoxins and neurotoxins, so you can expect paralysis, extreme pain, and even suffocation if you get bitten by one. Since the effects do not show up right away, the bites are not normally fatal if treatment can be administered quickly.

Tiger Snake

Tiger Snake

Black-Necked Spitting Cobra

These are deadly predators found in sub-Saharan Africa. The black-necked spitting cobra can grow up to a length of 2.2 meters. From its name, you can already guess what makes it special. The reptile can spit venom at targets from 23 feet away with bullseye accuracy. If it only hits the skin, it is harmless although it has a very good aim. If it hits the sensitive tissues of your eye, its neurotoxic venom might cause permanent blindness and agony.

Black-Necked Spitting Cobra

Black-Necked Spitting Cobra

Gaboon Viper

The Gaboon Viper is a stout and heavy viper. Adult ones can weigh as much as 19 pounds even if it is only 5.5 feet in length. You can find this creature in the savannas and rainforests of sub-Saharan Africa. When it is about to bite, it will bare its 2-inch long fangs that can penetrate deeply and inject venom. While it is not the most aggressive one here, it does bite when it is stepped on or cornered.

Gaboon Viper

Gaboon Viper

Rhinoceros Viper

This snake moves slowly and resembles the Gaboon Viper to some extent. What makes it special? When it is cornered, the Rhinoceros Viper will emit a loud hiss that sounds just like a shriek. The venom will attack the nervous and circulatory system, so watch out. It was named after the huge animal thanks to the two or three sets of huge “horns” located at its nose. In reality, they are horn-like scales.

Rhinoceros Viper

Rhinoceros Viper

Red-Bellied Black Snake

The Red-Bellied Black Snake is a striking snake that comes with glossy black scales as well as pink, red, or sunset-orange underbelly and sides. The colored scales will catch your eye thanks to the mottled pattern. It is found in Australia. It might have intense coloring, but it is one of the less deadly snakes in that area. It does not lay eggs but gives birth to babies in membranous sacs. The young emerge from these sacs almost right away.

Red-Bellied Black Snake

Red-Bellied Black Snake

King Brown Snake

The King Brown Snake is huge and can grow up to 10 feet in length. It has a pretty weak venom, but you should know that it can deliver a huge quantity of it. The snake can transmit almost 600 milligrams in just one bite. If it is left untreated, the venom can overwhelm the human body. Around 30 percent to 40 percent of its victims die. It is found in grasslands, woodlands, deserts, and scrubs in Australia, save for Tasmania and Victoria.

King Brown Snake

King Brown Snake

Sharp-Nosed Pit Viper

It is possible that this Southeast Asian viper species led to the birth of the “hundred pace poison” legend. It has very deadly hemotoxic venom that can cause ulcers, tissue necrosis, and hemorrhaging. According to old legends, a victim will only be able to walk a hundred paces before it dies. There are areas in which that figure drops down to only 50 paces. There is now an anti-venom, but will it reach the victim in only 100 steps?

Sharp-Nosed Pit Viper

Sharp-Nosed Pit Viper

Inland Taipan

In terms of the most deadly venom a snake can have, the Inland Taipan comes out on top each and every time. With a mix of taipoxin and neurotoxin, a bite can make the blood hemorrhage, cause limited breathing, paralysis, and serious muscle damage. Found mainly in inland Australia, the Inland Taipan is normally shy and reclusive, meaning that it will almost always run instead of attacking. However, if it does attack, death can occur within just 30-45 minutes unless the person is treated almost immediately.

Inland Taipan

Inland Taipan

Terciopelo Viper

For the most part, the Terciopelo viper can be found in the neotropical rainforest in Central America. The snake grows up to 8 feet long and has a head that’s 4 inches wide. On top of that, these snakes are responsible for the majority of snakebites in all of Central America. Their venom contains hemotoxins which lead to death if left untreated.

Terciopelo Viper

Terciopelo Viper

Many-banded Krait

Many-banded Krait, otherwise known as Taiwanese krait or the Chinese krait, is found in central and southern China as well as southeast Asia. Another incredibly dangerous snake, when its bites are left untreated, the mortality rate is between 25-35% to 70-100%.

Many Banded Krait

Many Banded Krait

Malayan Snake

You’ll find the Malayan snake in Southeast Asia and Indonesia. Also called the Blue Krait, this is another snake you won’t want to ever run into. It happens to contain a venom that’s 16 times more toxic than the Cobras.

Malayan Snake

Malayan Snake

Common Death Adder

You’ll find the Common Death Adder in Australia, New Guinea, and a few nearby islands. This snake is one of the most venomous ones in the world. Bites that are left untreated can cause death within 24 to 48 hours. Luckily, there is an antivenom for it. Not to mention, this snake is the fastest-striking snake in the world.

Common Death Adder, Acanthophis Antarcticus, Bruce Thomson.

Common Death Adder

Green Mambas

Firstly, there are three kinds of green mambas in the world – clearly, one wasn’t enough. Green mambas – Western, Eastern, and Jameson, are incredibly venomous, highly aggressive, and very unpredictable. All three species are also lightning-quick, agile, and arboreal. On top of all that, their venom is rapid-acting and the dendrotoxins are much more devastating to the central nervous system, leading to severe neurotoxicity.

Green Mambas

Green Mambas

Forest Cobra

The Forest Cobra, aka the black cobra, aka the white-lipped cobra is native to Africa and is the largest true cobra species. Including the tail, it grows up to 10 feet long. Yikes. As we all know, cobras can be quite lethal, so let’s just hope we never run into one.

Forest Cobra

Forest Cobra

Jararaca

The best-known venomous snake in all the wealthy and populated areas of Southeastern Brazil, the Jararaca is lethal. In fact, between 1902 and 1945, this snake was responsible for around 52% (3,446 cases) of snakebites, with a total of 0.7% mortality rates (25 deaths). Of course, their venom is deadly.

Jararaca

Jararaca

South American Bushmaster

This snake is the South American Bushmaster. It’s the longest venomous snake in the Western Hemisphere. Or rather, it’s the longest pit viper on Earth. Found in South America, it’s mainly seen in the equatorial forests east of the Andes. On top of that, they’re large, fast, and aggressive.

South American Bushmaster

South American Bushmaster

Cape Cobra

The Cape Cobra is one of the deadliest snakes in existence. It’s native to Africa and it has lethal venom. Not to mention, it tends to live around or inside houses. More often than not, death can occur within an hour to ten hours after the bite.

Cape Cobra

Cape Cobra

Dugite

Dugite, aka Pseudonaja affinis, is a highly venomous Australian brown snake. This snake’s venom contains presynaptic and postsynaptic neurotoxins, as well as procoagulants. We can tell you with certainty that all of those are unpleasant.

Dugite

Dugite

Belcher’s Sea Snake

While it’s thin and rather short, Belcher’s Sea Snake is one of the deadliest creatures in the entire world. Their venom is insanely potent as well. Just a milligram of their venom could kill thousands of adult human beings.

Belchers Sea Snake

Belchers Sea Snake

Desert Horned Viper

This snake is rather odd. The Desert Horned Viper moves sideways. Normally found in the Middle East and in northern parts of Africa. Oh, they’re also incredibly toxic. Just stay far away from these vipers.

Desert Horned Viper

Desert Horned Viper

Tiger Keelback

The Tiger Keelback can be found in East Southeast Asia. These snakes normally grow to 24 to 39 inches in length. The green, black, and orange snake is extremely venomous, but isn’t all that aggressive, surprisingly enough.

Tiger Keelback

Tiger Keelback

Burrowing Asp

The Burrowing Asp, like its name implies, likes to hide underground, typically near children’s playgrounds, which makes it all the scarier. Not to mention, this snake injects its poison deeper than any other snake.

Burrowing Asp

Burrowing Asp

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